Hand

And here is our third winner – Flora Waycott, Special Studio Award Winner in the 2014 Global Talent Search! We checked in with Flora shortly after she heard the news, and this is what she had to say:

Flora-Waycott-profile-pic

1) Congratulations! How do you feel right now having heard the news that you are a Special Studio Award winner in the 2014 Global Talent Search?

I am beyond thrilled! It is such a wonderful opportunity and I am so delighted that my entry has brought me to this point. It still hasn’t really sunk in so right now I am just really excited!

Print

 One of Flora’s pieces for the Final

2) Did you have any idea that you might win?

No! I knew I was up against some really incredible competition so it was a really lovely surprise.

Print

  Flora’s second piece for the Final

3) What are you most excited about in terms of working with Lilla Rogers Studio?

I am feeling most excited about Lilla being my mentor and seeing my work grow. She really helped me make my work richer through the MATS course and I am delighted to have her support as my agent. I am also excited to have the opportunity to have my work seen by more clients and to work with some really inspiring people.

624_florawaycott_florawaycottgts14a2gardenpicnic

 Flora’s Semi-Final piece

4) How did the Make Art That Sells course help you prepare for the Global Talent Search? What difference did it make to the work you were able to submit? 

The course helped me to structure my illustration pieces through the minis and then through to the weekly assignments, helping me manage my time and meet deadlines. Each market was covered in detail, with helpful tips on what the specific clients in those markets look for so this helped when answering the GTS assignments. The course also taught me to practice my art constantly, to make it better by spending time on it. When answering the GTS assignments I found that all that time I had put in to practicing my art often and the information give during the MATS course helped me to create better icons, better line work and have a better understanding of overall composition than I did before.

florawaycott_florawaycottgts14a1explore

Flora’s first round piece 

5) What is your big dream for your creative career?

I would love to have a diverse range of work, work with some dream clients and to be able to inspire others. I remember all of those people who have helped me along the way and inspired me (and still do!) and I would love to give that to other people!

Flora-Waycott-Logo-550px-wide

About Flora

Flora Waycott is an British illustrator and designer creating charming drawings and patterns inspired by her surroundings, with a fun and whimsical approach. With a love of travel and a curious mind, she is constantly inspired by new discoveries, whether it is the shape of a leaf or the contents of her kitchen cupboard. Flora graduated with a textile design degree in 2004 and has since worked as a textile and pattern designer and illustrator, with her work appearing on products from children’s apparel to stationery. Having spent her childhood in Japan, she has Japanese influences in her work and returns as often as she can to soak up the culture and inspiration, topping up her growing stationery collection and filling her sketchbook with drawings, origami and photos to spark new ideas. She currently lives and works in Wellington, New Zealand.

Find out more: website / blog / instagram / facebook / pinterest / twitter

You can see the blogpost Flora wrote about GTS here.

Did you know that every single one of the Global Talent Search finalists were graduates of Lilla’s Make Art That Sells course? It just goes to show what a huge impact it has on the professionalism and commercial viability of the work created by those who take part. If you have a big dream for your creative career, Make Art That Sells could be exactly what you need. Class begins TODAY! - This is your last chance to jump on board!

2 commentsblog / Global Talent Search / Lilla Rogers Studio School / Make Art That Sells

Hand
Saturday, October 18th, 2014
The little girl who loved to make art…

In this beautiful video the very talented Carla Martell takes us on an adventure with a little girl who loved to make art, and discovered the Make Art That Sells course.

Is this you in the video? If so, don’t miss out – join Make Art That Sells and discover a whole new creative tribe whilst learning how to make your art more commercially viable in the top ten hottest markets for art.

Class starts on MONDAY. Hurry – register now.

5 commentsblog / Lilla Rogers Studio School

Hand

We loved the beautiful illustrations in Make Art That Sells graduate Harriet Mellor’s video, in which she shares what she learnt in the course and how it inspired her.

The acclaimed online course Make Art That Sells teaches you how to create commercially viable work for the top hottest markets for art. We tell you what they are looking for, who is buying and how to sell to them. It’s five weeks of awesome.

Class starts on MONDAY. Hurry - register now.

1 commentblog / Lilla Rogers Studio School

Hand
Friday, October 17th, 2014
Q&A with Lilla – Gift

question of the dayWALL

Our ‘Q&A with Lilla’ series is back! This is where we share questions from the previous class of Make Art That Sells. You can see what a wide variety of topics are covered – and you might even find the answer to that burning question you have been wanting to ask! This round up is from the final week of class, covering the Gift Market but also looking at different aspects of making art your career.

Q) What’s the best way to know if we have talent?  How can we tell if we would be better off to play at art for our own pleasure rather than try and ‘make art that sells?

A) I am asked that a lot. I knew that I had to be an artist. I was completely determined. My question to you is, are you willing to work hard? Talent is a muscle. You can get better at it. Continue to take classes and make art. When you want to make art rather than do other things, then you know it’s for you. Some people like the idea of being an artist but don’t want to put in the time. Some give up right before they make it. Some stay with it and have thriving careers. But this is not a get-rich-quick scheme, as I always say. That being said, there is an art career for everyone. It may be in craft, in teaching, in owning a gallery, in all the various markets covered in Make Art That Sells, etc.

 

Q) My experience from the past 5 assignments of the Make Art That Sells class is we may end up develop various art styles we equally like. Creating art for West Elm could be totally different from Blue Q, for example. When we are moving forward, what should we do to deal with the different styles?

A) That’s great to have work that has range! Then, you promote it and see what pulls work and commissions. Then, you show that work, and your body of work gets stronger and stronger.

 

Q) How do you manage and promote so many artists and bring them enough jobs equally? From an artist point of view, I found being represented by an agent is putting a major part of my career into someone else’s hands.

A) No roster of artists in an agent’s group gets equal amounts of work. Some artists stay fresh and grow, some don’t. Some have work that is more marketable than others. As far as putting your career in someone else’s hands, do your research before you sign on.

 

Q) When we are trying to approach potential clients / art directors, or when we try to follow up after sent them emails, do you recommend artists to make phone calls to them? Do agents make calls to their potential clients to introduce new artists / new art works?

A) Nowadays, most contacting is via email and shows. We are all pretty busy and phone calls are harder to respond to.

 

Q) I found it is difficult to manage my time creating new art for so many different industries, but sending update to my clients (or potential clients) to make them remember me takes even more time. Do you have good tips for managing both?

A) Make a schedule. Chip away in bits and pieces. For example:

Mondays after AM walk: Send work to 5 clients and spend ½ hour posting on social media

Wednesdays after coffee with friends: Create newsletter

Fridays in the evening while watching favorite show: Send out newsletter.

It’s good to plug in tasks in your calendar and hook them up to a standing event you already do, like drop off kids, or go on walk with friend.

Also, I love asana.com for organizing my tasks.

 

Q) I’m definitely feeling tension between my digital style and my natural media style. Are there overarching principles that apply when these are successfully combined? Would it be best to develop the different styles by slanting each to specific, different markets?

A) Hard to say. Play around. Try different things until you see what you like. There is no particular rule. You can make elements traditionally and then scan them in. I like to do backgrounds in paint and my icons in brush and ink and then scan everything in.

 

Q) Most artists seem to have a blog. I didn’t realize until I started Make Art That Sells. Is it an unwritten rule in the art and licensing business that we all need a blog?

A) You definitely need a website so everyone can see your work, and a blog is a great way to keep your site fresh with your latest work, sketches, information, etc.

 

Q) Would you prefer to see a traditional online portfolio (with a selection of the best work) rather than an artist’s blog, or vice versa?

A) An online portfolio is best for me.

Banner_RegisterMATSA&B_550x200

Got your own questions for Lilla? Join us for the next round of Make Art That Sells. Class begins on MONDAY (October 20).

Book your spot here!

no commentsblog / Lilla Rogers Studio School / Make Art That Sells

Hand

Lilla has a few choice words to say about your brand, and it might not be what you are expecting. Watch this video for some advice on how to make yours really special:

Want to learn more about how to make your art unique and commercially viable so you get cool jobs in hot markets? Join us for Make Art That Sells. It starts online on Monday and it might just be the most important five weeks of your art education. Hurry and book your spot here.

15 commentsblog / Lilla Rogers Studio School / Make Art That Sells

Hand

Today we are thrilled to share a peek into what it feels like to be chosen as a Special Studio Winner in the 2014 Global Talent Search. Here’s Rebecca Jones…

Rebecca-Jones-headshot

1) Congratulations! How do you feel right now having heard the news that you are a Special Studio Award winner in the 2014 Global Talent Search?
It is an amazing feeling! It really was a dream come true. I was so happy! I danced around the room with my 6 year old son. I have worked really hard over the last year at my illustration work. Drawing and designing in every spare moment. It is such a great feeling to know that it has paid off.

Rebecca_Jones_GTS14_Round3-1-2

One of Rebecca’s final pieces from the competition 

2) Did you have any idea that you might win?

I entered because I just thought, why not? But I honestly didn’t expect to win anything at all. After completing MATS and also being part of Bootcamp, I knew how many seriously talented artists and illustrators there are out there. I felt like a small fish in a big sea. Once I got into the top 50, that is when my determination to succeed really kicked in! I realised then that I could have a chance, and I really did give the next two projects absolutely everything I had.
Rebecca_Jones_GTS14_Round3-2
Rebecca’s other final piece from the competition
3) What are you most excited about in terms of working with Lilla Rogers Studio?
So many things! I love the energy and passion of Lilla and her team. And of course the fact that they seem to get their artists some of the coolest jobs around with some fabulous clients I have only dreamt of working with!
624_rebeccajones_rebeccajonesgts14a2supersleuth
Rebecca’s semi-final piece
4) How did the Make Art That Sells (MATS) course help you prepare for the Global Talent Search? What difference did it make to the work you were able to submit?
I learnt so much doing those courses. Even though I have been a professional designer for many years, I don’t think you ever stop learning. Doing MATS has reminded me of the importance of drawing and experimenting before beginning a project. I had fallen into the bad habit of getting a brief, and going straight into the final design. Now after MATS, I just keep on drawing and drawing, and try not to worry at first about how the final design might look. It  has also helped me to polish up on my presentation skills – which I think is pretty important.
rebeccajones_rebeccajonesgts14a1imagine
Rebecca’s first round piece
5) What is your big dream for your creative career?
My big dream, after many years of working as an in-house designer would be to have a line of gorgeous products, in a store that I love, with my name attached. I would also love to be able to illustrate some children’s books.
Studio Logo - Rebecca Jones

About Rebecca

I am an English designer and illustrator living in Melbourne, Australia. I studied for a BA(Hons) in Textiles and Fashion at Winchester School of Art. I worked for various companies after graduating, the most exhilarating being a job as an embroidery and print designer for a fashion studio. The work was very creative, and my designs sold all over the world to companies such as Anthropologie and Gap. After moving to Australia on a bit of a whim, I worked for various home decor companies. As well as designing, my job enabled me to travel the world researching trends. I took time out after having my son, and began to create work that was just for me again. I would draw all day long if I could now. I am inspired by my own childhood memories, vintage children’s books, and by nature and wildlife.

Find out more: website / facebook

Did you know that every single one of the Global Talent Search finalists were graduates of Lilla’s Make Art That Sells course? It just goes to show what a huge impact it has on the professionalism and commercial viability of the work created by those who take part. If you have a big dream for your creative career, Make Art That Sells could be exactly what you need. Class begins on October 20 - Book your spot now!

6 commentsblog / Global Talent Search / Lilla Rogers Studio School / Make Art That Sells

Hand
Thursday, October 16th, 2014
Q&A with Lilla – Wall art

question of the dayWALL

Our ‘Q&A with Lilla’ series is back! This is where we share questions from the previous class of Make Art That Sells. You can see what a wide variety of topics are covered – and you might even find the answer to that burning question you have been wanting to ask! These questions were asked during the Wall Art Market week in class.

 

Q) If you use some of your own surface designs to form patterned areas within wall art and it has already been licensed in a different market area, would you need to seek permission from a client to use it?

A) Yes. When you get a licensing gig, you want to be sure to find out usage and exclusive. “Exclusive” means where you cannot also license the work. For example, if you sold the patterned work to bolt fabric, they may require that art to be exclusive in bolt, but it may be OK to license in all other categories. So you would look at your records and know that you could license that particular piece in, say, wall art.

 

Q) And if your pattern hadn’t been licensed and you wish to license the pattern in its entirety, would you need to inform your potential client that it had already been used to form a small area in wall art?

A) It’s always good to tell all parties where the image is also licensed.

 

Q) In her interview in Make Art That Sells, Carly Gray of Oopsy Daisy mentions that they can make the art into many products and that people like buying them often as a matching collection. For some of us, this is a cool idea, making a collection, or thinking about the application of our work on different objects. But do art directors like to see that in our portfolios? Do they see a complete dining set with matching napkins and runner in a portfolio and get excited or do they prefer to just see the art and do the product thinking themselves? Is that different in different markets?

A) It’s good to do both! Some like to see mocked up products and some like to see the art as is and they get to brainstorm products from your art. What would be fun for you to have in your portfolio? Start there.

 

Q) If we don’t hear back from the art director, should we continue to bug them every 1-2 months with more work? How do we know if they are genuinely not interested (say, our style is not a good fit), so we’d stop bugging them?

A) By bugging them, I assume you mean sending them a newsletter, an email or postcard with your latest work. We (agents and art directors) don’t mind that. Remember, art directors need great work to help their products sell. It’s part of their job to look at work.

 

Q) As a continuation to the last question: For the “follow up in 1-2 months” strategy, let’s say I do have new bolt fabric work, but I also want to follow up with wall art and storybook publishers too, amongst others. Is it crucial to repurpose the designs to that specific industry, or is it OK if we just let them know what we’ve been doing, as long as it is related to the “marketable art and illustration” industry, and they’d understand?

A) First, you can definitely show other markets your work from a different market. That is, you can show your bolt collection to an apparel client. Just be sure that the bolt collection is on the market and OK to show. If in doubt, simply ask your client when the work is OK to show. They will be very happy for you to promote it.

Second, clients love to see lots of great work. Some should be right for their particular market, but it doesn’t all have to be right for them.

 

Q) What is the best way to approach an agent – do we need a whole portfolio first, or just a few pieces?

A) I can only speak for myself, but I know that we need to see quite a bit of varied work. This is because we like to get work for the artist right away, and the more strong work we have the more options there are. It’s very competitive.

 

Q) What do you think about having different styles for different markets? For example, vector for children’s and paint/collage for wall art? Is it too confusing to have it all when promoting our work?

A) It’s fine. The Apparel market is less interested in a “brand”, (so having a variety of work is fine), while editorial, for example, needs to see a consistent style so that they can commission you and know what they are getting.

 

Q) Can you/ should you sign artworks you are submitting for wall art? I always sign things I’m making to be hung on the wall, but perhaps this is different for licensing?

A) Great to sign things. Make sure your signature is as well done as your art. Keep it on a layer in case the client doesn’t want it on there.

 

Q) I see some artists using cursive script in their hand-lettering, but I had believed legibility to be an issue. How do you judge if it is successful?

A) My test is to ask myself if each letter could be read as a different letter. For example, might the letter “r” be at all mistaken for an “n”? If in doubt, then it needs to be clearer.

 

Banner_RegisterMATSA&B_550x200

Got your own questions for Lilla? Join us for the next round of Make Art That Sells. Class begins on Monday October 20.

Book your spot here!

2 commentsblog / Lilla Rogers Studio School / Make Art That Sells

Hand
Wednesday, October 15th, 2014
Q&A with Lilla – Children’s Picture Books

question of the dayWALL

Our ‘Q&A with Lilla’ series is back! This is where we share questions from the previous class of Make Art That Sells. You can see what a wide variety of topics are covered – and you might even find the answer to that burning question you have been wanting to ask! These questions were asked during the Children’s Picture Book Market week in class.

Q: How subversive and/or dark can you be and still get work with larger clients?

A: This takes time to learn. Are there companies that are doing work you like? Send your work to them. Find products that you like and see who is making them. You can adapt a piece like that to feature items that are less subversive, too. The question is, are you willing to adapt to make money? Can you adapt and still love your work, not sell out? We live in a society that requires some degree of compromise in every field. But remember, you can make pieces for yourself, too. I do see a demand for your style. You will just need to look for those clients.

 

Q) I am a writer and have written a story that I plan to illustrate.  How willing are publishers to look at books written and illustrated by the same person, and how developed should the product be (i.e. Fully illustrated? Just a few pages? Digital or hard copy?) before submitting?

A: Most artists have not studied writing and therefore are not as strong in their writing as they are in their art. That being said, go for it if you are a writer! It’s always great to take risks as long as you have many eggs in many baskets. One way is to first get work for your art, and over time, you can pitch your idea to your editor/art director. It’s going to be easier to get work for your art since that is what you have much more experience with, unless of course you are a professional or experienced writer, in which case, go for it!

 

Q: I have an idea for a children’s book but I do not consider myself a writer. Is it possible to pitch an idea to a publisher in hopes that they would connect you with a writer? Or are you better off looking for a writer first?

A: Don’t look for a writer first. The art director’s job is to take manuscripts from authors that they have signed, and then match them with an illustrator.

 

Q: What level of creative control does an illustrator get for a children’s book? Do you think it will expand one’s marketability by having anthropomorphized animals her/his portfolio? This class is epic. Thank you.

A: Thanks! Creative control is something you earn over time. It is not given day one, for your very first book. Do you like doing anthropomorphized animals? Then do them.

 

Q: I was told that Terms & Conditions and rates of a normal children’s board book is different from an educational book. What is the difference between the two?

A: Educational books tend to pay less per illustration, and be work for hire. That means they own all rights. We used to try to negotiate this to no avail. Then we realized it’s fine. They just don’t want the art from the second grade reader showing up on some sketchy site!

 

Q) My question is regarding eyes when it comes to children books. Do bigger eyes sell better? I like both big eyes and little dot eyes.

A) Not necessarily. But dots for eyes typically don’t reflect emotion as well as more developed eyes.

 

Q) Would hand lettering the cover or any part of a book make it less likely to get translated into other languages?

Lilla: That’s a good point. I know for my book I couldn’t hand-letter the title for that reason. But I’ve seen SO many children’s books that are hand-lettered and so many of our artists that we represent are asked to hand-letter their covers.

 

Q) If we write and illustrate our own book which then gets published, can we still license icons from it afterwards (in fabric & other paper media)? 

Lilla: Usually you can negotiate that, no problem.

 

Q) I am working on an alphabet book. there still a call for it? How would one pitch an alphabet idea? Are there drawbacks if it is centered around learning concepts rather than a story?

A) Alphabets are always strong. They are also in demand in Wall Art for the children’s market. We’ve licensed flash cards ABC’s, too  An alphabet is a great way to strut your stuff and show how you approach this common theme in your own way.

 

Q) How do you get work illustrating for children’s magazines?  I have had a hard time finding submission guidelines for this area.

A) The Artists’ and Graphic Designers’ Market is a fantastic resource.  You can download the kindle edition if you are eager to have it, and it saves you a few dollars that way.  We will also be covering all about magazines in MATS Part B, (Editorial Market week).

 

Q) If I am submitting work to potential clients for children’s books, what is best to show them?

Lilla: Art directors have often told me that they suggest the artist illustrate a folk or fairy tale for their portfolio. Both finished double page spreads and sketchbook ideas can be good to show. Again, do what you’re passionate about and that will come out in the work. It’s very rare to visit an actual client with your portfolio, but if you can get an appointment, there’s nothing like the one-to-one. In that case, you’d bring a physical portfolio.

 

Q: What we should look for when selecting an illustration agent to represent us?

A: My book goes into great detail on agents, so you can look there. We also share a PDF on how to get an agent in Week 4 of MATS Part A.

This is a huge question, but a few top tips would be:

-Do you like their site?

-Does it look like they are getting lots of work?

-Are they representing artists similar to your style?

-Are they professional and have solid plans for how they get their artists work?

 

Banner_RegisterMATSA&B_550x200

Got your own questions for Lilla? Join us for the next round of Make Art That Sells. Class begins on Monday October 20.

Book your spot here!

no commentsblog / Lilla Rogers Studio School / Make Art That Sells

Hand
Wednesday, October 15th, 2014
Is this Make Art That Sells’ biggest fan?

In this fun video, Make Art That Sells (MATS) graduate Diane Neukirch shares why she is ‘MATS’ biggest fan’ – we love the playfulness of this testimonial. Thanks Diane!

The community aspect of Make Art That Sells is AMAZING. People who have met through the course have gone on to become real life friends, staunch supporters of each others’ creative careers, and even shared booths at Surtex. What difference would a creative tribe make to you? Make Art That Sells starts on Monday 20 October. Join us and find yours. Book your place here!

1 commentblog / Lilla Rogers Studio School

Join Our
Mailing List

ecojotlogojpg21.jpg

LRS-SW-blog-ad

zoe_blog_ad

helend_square_1.jpg

ROODE_AD

125x125_jenn_ski1.jpg

jillianad.jpg

RT_NEW-LOGO-2014_125PX_LR

lisacongdon-ad_small.jpg

mati_ad_animate.gif

marco_pp_ad.jpg

johnc_tile_02.gif

janellblog_ad.jpg

web.jpg

tdac-125pxad.jpg